Tag: Mary Pat Angelini

Angelini Bill Improving Mental Health & Drug Treatment in Prisons Earns Approval of the General Assembly

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Mary Pat Angelini

Assembly Republican Mary Pat Angelini sponsors legislation, approved today by the General Assembly, to improve the quality of mental health and substance abuse treatment for inmates. The bill (A-3722) requires the Department of Corrections (DOC) and the Department of Human Services (DHS) to share the authority over prison-based treatment centers.

“Inmates suffering from addiction or mental health issues will eventually serve their time and return to society,” said Angelini, the Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader. “Mental health issues and drugs are huge contributors to violence and crime in our neighborhoods. Better treatment can help prepare inmates for a crime-free life and make our streets safer.”

The measure, by establishing interagency oversight in the prisons, ensures that treatment standards and protocols are consistent so when prisoners get out, their treatment can continue on the same path, noted Angelini, R – Monmouth.

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Assembly Republicans rail against Democrat-sponsored legislation, call it ‘anti-American’

PolitckerNJ -

Republican leaders in the General Assembly are lashing out against a whole host of Democratic-sponsored legislation that is slated for a vote today, calling bills aimed at encouraging the purchase of American-made products in the state part of a “bad for business round-up.”

At a press conference convened by Assembly Minority leader Jon Bramnick (D-21) shortly before the Assembly’s session, Republicans said they would vote against a package of bills requiring manufactured products used in certain governmental contracts to be made in America. Also referred to as “Made in America,” the package’s primary bill requires that vendors receiving contracts, including public work contracts, with state and local governments, as well as public institutions of higher education, purchase goods manufactured in the United States.

Bramnick said the bills, which have already received heavy opposition from business leaders in the state, said the legislation is “anti-American” and bad for the state’s economy.

“We have international companies that have settled here, that we kept here, and now we’re telling them directly that they’re going to be second class citizens,” Bramnick said. “We can’t afford in an economy that is as fragile as New Jersey’s to do anything except promote our companies — and some of them are international companies.”

“Made in America? We’ll call it the anti-job bill, because that’s what’s it’s going to do,” he added.

Assemblyman David Rible (R-30) backed up Bramnick, saying the bills included an “anti-America proposal.”

The package is just one in slew of more than 50 bills up for a vote in the Assembly today ahead of the holidays. One of the most controversial includes measures to stabilize an economically and financially embattled Atlantic City with tax breaks and other business incentives, sponsored by Assemblyman Vince Mazzeo (D-2). The body had also planned on posting a paid sick leave bill as well, which has also taken flak from some businesses in the state, though the legislation was ultimately held for a later date.

Republican railed against those bills, too, saying in Atlantic City’s case, the legislature should wait for the direction of Gov. Chris Christie, who has led a series of summits with casino owners, lawmakers, local officials and business leaders over the past months in order to come up with a broad-based solution to the beleaguered gaming mecca’s problems.

“The governor is in the process of seeking a global solution,” Bramnick said, “and meanwhile the Democrats jump out ahead and do a piecemeal solution.”

On paid sick leave, he added: “Democrats were going to post paid sick leave, but they must have come to their senses and realized you can only do so many anti-business bills in one day or in one year.”

Other Republican lawmakers present at the presser included Assemblywoman Amy Handlin (D-13), Minority Whip Scott Rumana, Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini, and Deputy Republican Leader Anthony Bucco.

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Angelini talks about Facilities Housing Poorer NJ Residents

NJ Spotlight -

New Jerseyans who live in boarding homes or homeless shelters — as well as the agencies that place people in these facilities — don’t have easy access to health and safety reports by state and local inspectors.

That would change under a bipartisan proposal advancing in the Legislature that would require the state Department of Community Affairs to post those reports on its website.

Mary Pat Angelini

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini (R-Monmouth) said she’s been disturbed by reports of violations at facilities in Ocean County.

“Many of these places are very well-run, but there are some exceptions,” Angelini said, adding that she was “a little bit offended” that DCA officials had expressed concern about the additional work that would be involved in implementing the bill.

That concern is likely rooted in the relatively small staff available to do the inspections, noted Mary Lynne Reynolds, executive director of the Mental Health Association of Southwestern New Jersey, which provides advocacy and training related to mental-health issues. The state Division of Codes & Standards has staff members responsible for inspecting 700 facilities, forcing them to “triage” complaints that they receive, she said.

Since homeless shelters and boarding houses are inspected by local and county officials, the bill would also require them to submit their reports for posting on the DCA website.

If an inspection reveals a serious health and safety violation, the report would have to be posted on the website within 72 hours, under the bill, which would also require DCA to post news of any suspensions of facility licenses within the same time period. The department would also be required to post information on changes in a facility’s status as it corrects violations or its suspension ends.

The Assembly voted in favor of the bill 75-2 on Monday. The Senate is scheduled to vote on it today. The hearing in which the Assembly Human Services Committee released the bill was in September.

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General Assembly Approves Bucco & Angelini Bill to Improve Living Conditions in Residential Care Centers

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Deputy Republican Leader Anthony M. Bucco and Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini sponsor legislation to improve conditions for residents of boarding homes and other shelters that moved closer to implementation after today’s approval from the General Assembly.

Bucco and Angelini’s bill (S-1856/A-3175) requires state and local officials to post on the internet the inspection reports from residential health care centers, boarding homes and homeless shelters that fail inspections for health or safety violations.

Anthony M. Bucco

“Increased accountability means better care,” said Bucco, R – Morris and Somerset. “Some facilities are poorly run, and opening inspection results to the public will increase transparency. It will apply pressure on the operators to make necessary improvements, resulting in better living conditions and enhanced care.”

Mary Pat Angelini

“Deplorable living conditions will no longer be hidden behind a curtain of secrecy,” said Angelini, R – Monmouth. “The problems and dangers in these homes, and the operators responsible for them, will be disclosed. Increased scrutiny will enhance the quality of life and safety for residents.”

Department of Community Affairs (DCA) officials provide inspections of residential health care facilities, while local officials are responsible for emergency shelters for the homeless and rooming and boarding houses. Under the bill, the DCA’s commissioner will establish standard inspection practices.

Bucco and Angelini’s bill, approved unanimously by the Senate in June, moves to the governor’s desk for consideration.

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Assembly Approves Bucco & Angelini Bill to Improve Living Conditions in Residential Care Centers

Assembly Republican Press Release -

Deputy Republican Leader Anthony M. Bucco and Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini sponsor legislation to improve conditions for residents of boarding homes and other shelters that moved closer to implementation after today’s approval from the General Assembly.

Bucco and Angelini’s bill (S-1856/A-3175) requires state and local officials to post on the internet the inspection reports from residential health care centers, boarding homes and homeless shelters that fail inspections for health or safety violations.

Anthony M. Bucco

“Increased accountability means better care,” said Bucco, R – Morris and Somerset. “Some facilities are poorly run, and opening inspection results to the public will increase transparency. It will apply pressure on the operators to make necessary improvements, resulting in better living conditions and enhanced care.”

Mary Pat Angelini

“Deplorable living conditions will no longer be hidden behind a curtain of secrecy,” said Angelini, R – Monmouth. “The problems and dangers in these homes, and the operators responsible for them, will be disclosed. Increased scrutiny will enhance the quality of life and safety for residents.”

Department of Community Affairs (DCA) officials provide inspections of residential health care facilities, while local officials are responsible for emergency shelters for the homeless and rooming and boarding houses. Under the bill, the DCA’s commissioner will establish standard inspection practices.

Bucco and Angelini’s bill, approved unanimously by the Senate in June, moves to the governor’s desk for consideration.

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Angelini welcomes opening of new workforce technology center in Eatontown

Source: NJ Advance Media -

State and local officials helped celebrate the grand opening of the new Festo Didatic Center for Workforce Technology Education on Industrial Way on Monday.

Mary Pat Angelini

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini, R-Monmouth, said Monday’s grand opening was a terrific opportunity to see a business growing in New Jersey, particularly in Monmouth County.

“Good, strong communities need good cooperate partners,” Angelini said. “I know this is going to be a very strong corporate partnership … and hopefully I’ll be back here in a year with an expansion.”

The Festo Didactic Center, part of the Festo AG company with 17,600 employees in more than 100 countries, is a high-tech learning laboratory that will help provide the kind of instruction that modern manufacturers need to compete and succeed.

According to the company, two million manufacturing jobs in the United State are unfilled due to a lack of trained individuals.

Nader Imani, CEO of Festo Didactic Inc., said the new center would be a “job multiplier in New Jersey and beyond for many years to come.”

Tim Lizura, president of the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, thanked Festo Didactic, on behalf of the state, for locating the facility in New Jersey.

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Angelini encourages responsible drinking awareness at Rutgers panel

Source: The Daily Targum -

Mary Pat Angelini

Mary Pat Angelini did not know what a keg stand was when she was in college.

The New Jersey assemblywoman, along with a group of panelists, spoke yesterday in the Livingston Student Center and brought up the cultural shift in alcohol consumption, which has increased in intensity and frequency since the panelists attended college.

The Good Samaritan Policy, also known as the 911: Lifeline Legislation, was passed in 2009 and offers underage drinkers immunity from prosecution if they call the police on behalf of other underage drinkers in need of medical attention.

The Scarlet Honor Council invited Angelini and a panel of public policy experts to speak yesterday to promote awareness of this law.

Lieutenant Paul Fischer of the Rutgers University Police Department said when students are not thinking clearly, avoiding getting into trouble can outweigh helping a friend who might be dying in front of their eyes.

“Our legislators need to hear about these issues,” Angelini said.

Legislators did not hear about the 1,800 college students who died from alcohol poisoning in the United States over the last year or the more than 97,000 who were sexually assaulted in an alcohol-related context, she said.

For Angelini, it is impossible to talk about alcohol abuse without the other crimes and issues associated with it.

Alcohol shows up in everything, Fischer said.

“I have the misfortune of having a job where I show up when people have lost the battle with alcohol abuse,” he said.

Joe DiMichele, director of Student Conduct, read the official wording of the law, which outlines the requirements for a student receiving immunity.

The immunity applies to any underage person who calls 911 reporting another underage person in need of medical assistance, according to the New Jersey National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence’s website.

The caller needs to be the first to make the report, provide his or her name and remain at the scene until emergency personnel arrive, according to NCADDNJ.org.

The amount of drugs in possession must be consistent with personal use, Fischer said. He emphasized that drinkers have no need to flee the scene, especially because medical personnel need urgent information about the person in trouble.

Elizabeth Amaya-Fernandez, a health education specialist at Rutgers Health Services, said trying to teach students this information is a tough job. She said it is important to be honest about alcohol and drugs.

Health Services attends every student orientation and transfer seminar, trying to reach as many people as possible.

Since the school year started, about 13 students have made emergency calls or have been stopped by police officers for alcohol-related issues each weekend.

These students are sent to a counseling program run by the Office of Student Conduct, which DiMichele calls “restorative justice.”

Angelini opposes a blanket legalization of drugs, an issue that has recently made headlines after several states approved the legalization of marijuana.

“The brain is not formed completely until you’re about 25 years old, so [these drugs] affect your brain,” she said.

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Angelini Lauds Historic Mid-Term Election of Women to Congress


Congress Has 100 Women for the First Time in History

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini lauded an important accomplishment for women on election night, as for the first time in American history, the number of women sitting in Congress hit triple digits to 100 on Tuesday, November 4th.

Mary Pat Angelini

“This mid-term election marked an historic accomplishment for women,” said Angelini. “There have never been as many women in Congress at one time, which shows that women are continuing to make strides in the political arena.”

Angelini said there were also some other notable firsts for women this mid-term election, including Iowa electing its first woman ever to the House or the Senate—the Senate’s first female combat veteran. In addition, the first African American Republican woman was elected to Congress, plus the youngest woman at 30 was elected to Congress from New York. New Jersey also ended a decade long period in which we did not have a female among our congressional delegation.

“I’m thrilled to see more women playing a role in our government,” said Angelini. “With so many critical issues facing women, it’s vital to have their voices heard in Congress. And while election night marked an historical achievement for women, we must continue to move forward by supporting and engaging women to attain leadership roles.”

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Angelini receives leadership award

Source: Atlanticville -

State Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini (R-Monmouth) was selected by the board of trustees of Children’s Aid and Family Services to receive the 2014 Building Futures Government Leadership Award for her commitment and support of children and families in New Jersey.

Mary Pat Angelini

“The work that Children’s Aid and Family Services does to help protect children in our communities is invaluable. It is a great honor to receive this leadership award from a compassionate organization that helps meet the social, educational, and emotional needs of vulnerable children and their families.” — Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini

Each year through its Building Futures Awards, Children’s Aid and Family Services — one of northern New Jersey’s leading nonprofit providers of human services and child welfare programs — honors individuals, companies and organizations dedicated to improving the community through supporting children and families.

“Children’s Aid and Family Services is delighted to be honoring Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini at our Building Futures Awards,” said Bob Jones, president and CEO of Children’s Aid and Family Services, in a press release. “Her commitment to drug- and alcohol-abuse prevention and education in New Jersey has made a huge difference in the lives of young people across the state,” he added.

“The work that Children’s Aid and Family Services does to help protect children in our communities is invaluable,” Angelini said. “It is a great honor to receive this leadership award from a compassionate organization that helps meet the social, educational, and emotional needs of vulnerable children and their families.”

Angelini accepted her Government Leadership Award at the Building Futures Awards Presentation, which was held at the Woman’s Club of Ridgewood on Sept. 30.

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Committee Approves Angelini Measure Improving Mental Health and Drug Treatment in Prisons

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Legislation sponsored by Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini improving the quality of mental health and substance abuse treatment for inmates was approved by the Assembly Human Services committee today. Angelini’s bill (A-3722) requires the Department of Human Services (DHS) and the Department of Corrections (DOC) to share the authority over prison-based treatment centers.

Mary Pat Angelini

“Mental health issues and drugs are huge contributors to violence and crime in our neighborhoods,” said Angelini, the Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader. “Inmates suffering from addiction or mental health issues will eventually serve their time and return to society. Better treatment can help prepare them for a crime-free life and make our streets safer.”

By establishing interagency oversight in the prisons, the measure ensures that treatment standards and protocols are consistent so when prisoners get out, their treatment can continue on the same path, said Angelini, R – Monmouth.

During the meeting, held at Fairleigh Dickinson University, the committee heard from invited experts on opioid addiction.

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