Tag: Mary Pat Angelini

Angelini bill to curb huffing trend among young people

Source: NJ 101.5 -

A New Jersey lawmaker is concerned that children could be using aerosol dusters, most commonly used to clean computer keyboards, to get high. Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini (R-Ocean) sponsors a bill to make it tougher for minors to get their hands on the product.

Mary Pat Angelini

“My bill makes it illegal to sell this type of product to anyone under the age of 18,” said Angelini. “Someone might tell kids, ‘Oh, you can huff this and get high and it’s just air. It can’t hurt you,’ but it’s actually a very complicated chemical mix that is very dangerous and could be deadly if inhaled.”

The legislation has been introduced in part to let parents and teachers know that inhalant abuse is a growing issue Angelini explained.

“According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse inhalants are actually the fourth most abused substance after alcohol, tobacco and marijuana,” Angelini said.

Under the bill, retailers would also have to post signs that state clearly: “Inhalant abuse can cause permanent injury or death. In New Jersey it is illegal to sell or give to a person under 18 years of age any aerosol duster.”

A civil penalty would be imposed on retailers who don’t comply with the requirement and criminal penalties would be imposed on anyone who violates the provisions of the legislation.

For more information on the scary trend of children abusing inhalants, you can go to www.inhalant.org or www.consumered.org. The average age of kids who start using inhalants is 10.

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Suspended driver’s license repeaters: Angelini and Dancer bill jails ‘em

Mary Pat Angelini

Ron Dancer

Asbury Park Press Editorial (8/23/14) -

Undoubtedly, the bill that Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini and Assemblyman Ronald Dancer are drafting that would require mandatory jail time for those convicted more than once of driving with a suspended license should be made into law as quickly as possible.

Not to be overly dramatic, but the law will save lives.

It would require that a person convicted of driving with a suspended license serve 30 days in jail for a second offense, 60 days in jail for a third offense, 90 days in jail for a fourth offense and a year in jail for any additional offense if the second or higher offense occurs within a five-year time frame.

In the first place, by definition, people with suspended licenses should not be driving.

But they do, because all too often the only punishment for being caught driving with a suspended license is … another suspended license. Currently, jail time is ordered only if a driver is involved in an accident that results in an injury while driving with a suspended license. This provides virtually no incentive to stay off the road and every incentive to keep driving and crossing your fingers against the possibility of being pulled over for some other traffic violation.

Apart from the sheer illegality of driving without a valid license is the chance of injuring or killing an innocent person.

Such a tragedy occurred earlier this month in the case of Berkeley resident Patrick Clayton, who is accused of striking and killing a man on Route 9. Clayton has been charged with death by auto, leaving the scene of a crash involving a death and causing a death while having a suspended license.

But Clayton should never have been behind the wheel. He has had his driving privileges suspended 25 times and hasn’t had a valid driver’s license since 2006. Of Clayton’s 25 suspensions, two were for driving while intoxicated, two for violating the Comprehensive Drug Reform Act and four for failing to comply with the mandated drug and alcohol programs. The 17 other suspensions were for failing to appear in court, failing to pay fines and nonpayment of surcharges. Those numbers beggar the imagination.

“Driving while your license is suspended should entail greater penalties than a slap on the wrist,” said Dancer, a Republican whose district includes parts of Ocean, Burlington, Middlesex and Monmouth counties. “By enacting a greater deterrent such as jail time, rather than just another license suspension, we can keep some of these habitual offenders off the road – and hopefully prevent another tragedy.”

Exactly. Le the Legislature say “enough is enough and let them say it loudly by enacting this bill as quickly as possible and finding ways to keep those with such utter disregard and disrespect for the law, and for others’ lives, off the roads. The proposed bill not only would act as a deterrent to those who drive illegally, but keep the roads and those who use them safer.

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Angelini-Dancer Bill targets suspended licenses in NJ

NJ 101.5 -

Two New Jersey lawmakers are drafting legislation to require mandatory jail time for those convicted more than once of driving with a suspended license.

The legislation is in response to an accident earlier this month when a man was struck and killed in Lacey Township. The driver of the van, Patrick Clayton, that hit the pedestrian reportedly had his license privileges taken away over two dozen times, and has not had a valid driver’s license since 2006.

Mary Pat Angelini

“The fact that people are not taking license suspensions seriously is in part why we need to really make the consequences as strong as they should be,” said Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini (R-Ocean).

Clayton had his license suspended 25 times for a variety of reasons, according to Angelini.

Under the bill, anyone convicted of driving with a suspended license would serve 30 days in jail for a second offense, 60 days for a third offense, 90 days for a fourth offense and a year in jail for any additional offense, if the second or higher offense occurs within a five-year period.

“Currently jail time is only ordered if a driver is driving with a suspended license and is involved in an accident that results in an injury,” Angelini said.

Angelini is set to introduce the measure in September along with Assemblyman Ron Dancer (R-Jackson).

Ron Dancer

“Driving while your license is suspended should entail greater penalties than a slap on the wrist,” said Dancer in an emailed press release on August 20. “By enacting a greater deterrent such as jail time, rather than just another license suspension, we can keep some of these habitual offenders off the road and hopefully prevent another tragedy.”

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Angelini-Dancer Bill Mandates Jail Time for Driving with Suspended License

Assembly Republican Press Release -

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini and Assemblyman Ronald Dancer are drafting legislation to require mandatory jail time for those convicted more than once of driving with a suspended license.

The legislation mandates that a person convicted of driving with a suspended license would serve 30 days in jail for a second offense, 60 days in jail for a third offense, 90 days in jail for a fourth offense, and a year in jail for any additional offense, if the second or higher offense occurs within a five-year time frame.

Mary Pat Angelini

“People with suspended licenses should not be on the road, and if they choose to ignore their suspension, they should face stricter penalties,” said Angelini, R-Monmouth. “Our goal is to keep our roads safer by deterring some of these habitual offenders who continue to drive with multiple suspensions.”

Currently, jail time is ordered only if a driver is involved in an accident that results in an injury while driving with a suspended license.

Ron Dancer

“Driving while your license is suspended should entail greater penalties than a slap on the wrist,” said Dancer, R-Ocean, Burlington, Middlesex and Monmouth. “By enacting a greater deterrent such as jail time, rather than just another license suspension, we can keep some of these habitual offenders off the road — and hopefully prevent another tragedy.”

The lawmakers said they were writing the bill in response to a recent case in which a man with multiple license suspensions is accused of striking and killing a Lacey man on Route 9.

According to the Asbury Park Press, the driver of the vehicle, 27-year-old Patrick Clayton, had his driving privileges suspended 25 times and hasn’t had a valid driver’s license since 2006. Clayton was charged with death by auto, leaving the scene of a crash involving death, and causing a death while driving with a suspended license.

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Angelini hosts Heroin roundtable and addresses needs to help fight epidemic

Star Ledger -

Lawmakers, healthcare professionals, members of law enforcement and representatives from behavioral health organizations and insurance companies were among nearly 20 people who sat down to discuss the heroin epidemic during a forum at Jersey Shore University Medical Center on Monday.

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini (R-Monmouth), who is also the executive director at Prevention First, said she organized the forum to get people from all aspects of professions together to discuss the heroin and opiate problem in Monmouth County.

Mary Pat Angelini

“The one depressing piece that came out of it is just the lack of coordination – we’re all working in our own little areas and I think it’s really important for us to become more coordinated in our efforts,” Angelini said.

She said her goal is to make discussing substance about part of integrated healthcare.

“It’s going to take a concerted effort,” Angelini said, adding that parents also need to have age appropriate conversations with their children.

Angelini said there needs to be an environmental change and it’s not just a public health or law enforcement problem.

“It’s tough work, it’s not easy,” she said. “For the sake of our communities, our children, our families, we have to get involved.”

In 2013, 69 people died from heroin overdoses in Monmouth County and 112 overdose deaths in Ocean County.

A pilot program launched in Monmouth and Ocean counties this year, put the opioid antidote Naloxone, also known as Narcan, in the hands of law enforcement.

To date, there have been 66 opiate overdose reversals in Ocean County since April, and 21 since June in Monmouth County.

Angelini said she hopes to meet quarterly to continue the discussion and ways to address the growing problem.

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Angelini: Open Space Preservation is Essential for Monmouth County

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Mary Pat Angelini

Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini, R – Monmouth, was gratified after the General Assembly approved SCR-84, a constitutional amendment that will provide a critical funding source to preserve farmland and open space. Voters will consider the amendment in November.

“Passage of this bill is great news for Monmouth County, where preserving open space is crucial to maintaining our high quality of life.

“This measure will establish a dedicated, stable source of funding to help preserve our dwindling open space and farmland. Protecting our remaining undeveloped lands is a wise investment in the future of our state and especially, in Monmouth County.”

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Angelini: Bail Reform is a Critical Step Toward Safer Streets, Neighborhoods

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Mary Pat Angelini

Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini, R – Monmouth, said the Assembly’s approval of bail reform legislation will help make New Jersey residents safer. Four days after Gov. Christie addressed a Joint Session of the Legislature urging both houses to vote on two pieces of bail reform legislation, Angelini, whose husband is a former detective, voted in favor of both A-1910 and ACR-177.

“We took a big step today toward reforming our bail system so it better protects law abiding New Jerseyans from callous and desperate offenders. By providing judges with an option to deny bail to the most ruthless, dangerous criminals, we can stop a cycle of violence and bloodshed that has become all too common. This will help make New Jersey’s streets and neighborhoods safer for all residents.”

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Angelini: Budget Provides and Incentive for Largest Taxpayers and Job Creators to Take the Next Exit Out of New Jersey

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Mary Pat Angelini

Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini, R – Monmouth, issued the following statement after the General Assembly voted on the Democrats’ budget increasing taxes in New Jersey by $1.4 billion:

“The Democrats’ tax hikes make New Jersey less competitive with nearby states. This policy will cost New Jersey dearly by providing an incentive for our job creators to flee the state for more affordable locations.

“As our state recovers from the long recession, we should be supporting the taxpayers and businesses that contribute to the economy. Instead, we are once again adding to the burden of people already paying the highest taxes in the country.”

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Angelini: Democrats’ Plan Jeopardizes Middle-Class Jobs

Mary Pat Angelini

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini,R – Monmouth,issued the following statement after Senate Democrat leaders announced a $1.6 billion income and business tax increase to balance the FY15 budget:

“The middle class needs jobs created and lower taxes, not the Democrats’ plan. Their massive tax increase piled on the backs of already over-burdened job-creators will lead to sending jobs to other states.”

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Angelini discusses why heroin is still killing at the Shore

Source: Asbury Park Press -

Sixteen-thousand bags of heroin taken off the street.

Twenty-five funerals averted.

Two guilty pleas of manslaughter.

After notching a record 112 drug overdose deaths in 2013 and becoming the epicenter of New Jersey’s heroin and opiate crisis, Ocean County is moving closer toward reducing deaths, curbing abuse and beating back relentless dealers. Yet 28 people so far this year have died of drug overdoses, 21 of them linked to heroin, according to the county prosecutor. At the same point last year, 50 people were dead from drugs.

While the number of lives saved and the lower death rate is a point of pride for county officials, the region and the state is still figuring out how to effectively deal with a heroin abuse crisis years in the making.

Nearly six months into 2014, New Jersey is at a critical point as it faces what legislators have been calling the No. 1 public health crisis since last fall. But those same lawmakers have also said that a comprehensive strategy to address it will be slow, as government goes, leaving places like Ocean County to take the epidemic into its own hands.

All but one of this year’s overdose deaths have been linked to heroin or prescription drugs.

While Ocean County has rolled out an array of new programs to combat the abuse, including a state pilot equipping police with the opiate antidote Narcan, progress has been mixed across the state.

State funding for new programs and treatment is limited to the $4.5 million expansion of drug court. Legislation designed to curb abuse and crack down on dealers has been slow to move through the Statehouse.

Joseph D. Coronato stepped into a blooming crisis last March when he took over as Ocean County prosecutor. By the first week of June, a little more than two months into his term as the county’s top law enforcement official, 53 people were dead of an overdose — the same number as all of 2012, according to his office. All but one of those deaths was linked to heroin or prescription drugs.

 

Users are still dying at a worrisome pace in Ocean County despite the Narcan program. The 28 overdoses through May equal an overdose death every five days; last year it was one every three days.

In Monmouth County, which saw a spike in heroin-related deaths in 2011 and 2012, it appears the overdose trend is holding. There were 61 heroin-related deaths in 2013; through February there were 13, according to the Prosecutor’s Office (the office said there is a backlog of toxicology tests causing the delay). If that rate holds, Monmouth County could see 78 heroin deaths this year, the most in at least five years.

Statewide, heroin deaths have been on the rise: 449 in 2011; 591 in 2012; and through the first half of 2013, the latest accurate data available, 267 people were dead from heroin, according to the Attorney General’s office.

The state Department of Human Services is also working on a statewide Narcan training program for family members and close relatives of opiate addicts, one of the measures included in the Overdose Prevention Act signed into law last year by Gov. Chris Christie. The effort, called the “bystander program,” is roughly based off a long-running program in Massachusetts to lower overdose deaths. Rolled out in 2006, the program has in some areas helped lower the overdose death rate by nearly 50 percent, and there is now on average one rescue a day, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

New Jersey, whose abundance of pharmaceutical companies has earned it the well-known nickname “the medicine chest of the world,” still does not require doctors to register and participate in the prescription monitoring program, an electronic system that tracks what prescriptions are being written, who they are written for and who is writing them. Prescription painkiller abuse often leads people to heroin, a cheaper but more potent alternative.

Most states have a prescription monitoring program, but New Jersey requires just pharmacies to register and use the database, according to the National Alliance for Model State Drug Laws, a federally funded nonprofit that works with the Office of National Drug Control Policy to draft model drug and alcohol laws and regulations in states.

Mary Pat Angelini

Legislation last year to strengthen prescription monitoring died in lame-duck session and has been reintroduced. Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini, R-Ocean and co-signer of an Assembly bill, said it has been “very frustrating” getting legislation passed. She has written former Assembly Speaker Sheila Oliver to take “swift action” on last year’s bills – senate and assembly versions – as well as current Speaker Vincent Prieto to make addressing the abuse epidemic a priority this legislative session.

“Sadly, the end result is I haven’t gotten a response,” she said.

Prieto could not be reached for comment, but issued a statement to the Asbury Park Press.

In it, he said lawmakers are “trying to resolve all the many concerns that have been brought up in the committee debates on these bills, and are willing to work with everyone involved to devise a workable and effective bill.

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