Tag: Mary Pat Angelini

Angelini bill would expand Safe Haven locations in NJ

NJ 101.5 -

A shocking tragedy that took place earlier this month in New Jersey has one lawmaker calling on her colleagues to approve a measure that would expand the state’s safe haven locations.

On Jan. 16, 22-year-old Hyphernkemberly Dorvilier allegedly set her baby on fire in the middle of a Pemberton Township road. When police arrived, they found a neighbor holding Dorvilier down on the ground and the baby wrapped in a smoldering towel and paper, according to court documents released by Burlington County prosecutors on Jan. 20. The baby was alive and breathing when she was flown to a hospital in Philadelphia, but died two hours later, according to authorities.

Dorvilier has been charged with murder.

Mary Pat Angelini

“The tragic situation in Burlington County really led to me thinking we need to expand the number of safe havens that we have in New Jersey,” said Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini (R-Monmouth). “Currently anybody can take an infant to hospitals and to police stations, but I felt very strongly that there needs to be an expansion of sites where distraught people can take an infant before another tragedy occurs.”

Under the current “New Jersey Safe Haven Infant Protection Act,” safe haven options are limited to emergency departments of general hospitals and state, county and municipal police stations where someone can leave a baby – no questions asked.

“I want to expand the law to include first aid squads, fire stations, any place that is manned 24 hours by emergency personnel,” Angelini explained.

The legislation was first introduced in 2006. It has been approved by committees in the past, but never passed by the full Legislature. Angelini has been a sponsor for the last two years and said she is very surprised that the latest version of the bill has not even been considered by a committee.

“So many times we are legislating through reaction to an occurrence, but this is something that I’ve been working on for the last couple of years,” Angelini said.

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Asbury Park Press Editorial on Angelini bill to make adult incest a crime

Asbury Park Press -

The last thing New Jersey needs is to be known as a safe haven for those who see the film “Deliverance” as a documentary guide to family planning, or the novel “Flowers in the Attic” as a how-to manual. Let’s face it: the gene pool is already shallow.

Mary Pat Angelini

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini, R-Monmouth, said this week she will propose legislation banning consensual adult incest. The immediate impetus for the alarm was a New York magazine interview with an anonymous Great Lakes-area 18-year-old who says she plans to informally marry her long-estranged biological father and move here.

The reason? New Jersey is one of the few states in which there aren’t penalties for incest if both participants in the sexual relationship are at least 18 years old. The woman said she has had a romantic relationship with her biological father for two years. Before that, father and daughter had been estranged for 12 years. Clearly, the relationship has been twisted for years.

Incest was outlawed in New Jersey until 1979, when the state enacted a new criminal code that left a section planned for incest blank. Oops. That’s a pretty substantial omission. that needs to be corrected as soon as possible. Admittedly, the incest issue doesn’t arise very often. There aren’t huge numbers of adults flocking to chapels or justices of the peace who want to marry their sons or daughters, or their brothers or sisters. A family tree with no branches is taking togetherness too far.

Angelini’s bill would make it a third-degree crime to marry or commit an act of sexual penetration with a blood relative including a parent or child, brother or sister, including half-siblings, or an uncle, aunt, nephew or niece. Penalties would include a prison term of three to five years, a fine of up to $15,000, or both.

Apart from these mind- and morality-twisting events, there are heavy medical risks in such births. Research has shown that the offspring of a brother-sister or parent-child union have only a 50-50 chance of avoiding a severe birth defect or some mental deficiency. If New Jersey keeps adult incest legal, who knows what kind of genetic drought will ensue? New Jersey should join the vast majority of states and criminalize these relationships.

Typically, Americans believe that the government should stay out of people’s bedrooms. That is generally a common-sense approach to the jurisprudence of privacy. But in rare cases, the state belongs in the bedroom. Adult consensual incest is one of those times. The state must ban the practice.

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Rumana on proposal to ban incest in New Jersey

Source: WPIX-TV [video] -

A New Jersey lawmaker plans to introduce legislation that would ban adult incest in the state.

The idea has been portrayed in both books and movies such as “Flowers in the Attic”.

But the topic of incest, not just among siblings, but also between father and daughter – now has real world implications in the New Jersey Legislature, of all places.

Scott Rumana

“Never in my wildest dreams did I think that our code our statute did not prohibit this activity. And that’s what we’re acting so quickly, because that door must be closed,” said New Jersey Assemblyman Scott Rumana.

Scott Rumana and Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini, along with other colleagues announced plans Wednesday.

“I don’t think anybody, by any moral, or ethical, or any other test, would not find this to be something that we should allow, and should take immediate action to stop,” said Rumana.

The bill would make it illegal to marry or commit an act of sexual penetration with a blood relative, including half-siblings. Violators could face three to five years in prison and a fine of up to $15,000.

Angelini, a Republican from Monmouth County, said adult incestuous relationships “violate our acceptable moral standards” and often involve sexual abuse that is blurred by the “consensual” loophole.

The measure comes in the wake of a New York magazine report that a Great Lakes-area 18-year-old plans to marry her long-estranged biological father and move to New Jersey.

 

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Angelini proposing ban on incest in New Jersey

Source: Asbury Park Press -

Adult incest, surprisingly, is legal in New Jersey. But that could change.

A Shore-area assemblywoman says she’ll propose legislation banning adult incest, in the wake of a New York magazine interview with an anonymous Great Lakes-area 18-year-old who says she plans to informally marry her long-estranged biological father and move to New Jersey because there aren’t penalties in the state so long as both participants in the sexual relationship are at least 18 years old.

Mary Pat Angelini

“It might be hard to believe, but incest among consenting adults is technically legal in New Jersey,” Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini, R-Monmouth, said in announcing the legislation. “Obviously, these types of relationships violate our acceptable moral standards and should be banned.”

The bill would make it a third-degree crime to marry or commit an act of sexual penetration with a blood relative including a parent or child, brother or sister, including half-siblings, or an uncle, aunt, nephew or niece. Penalties would include a prison term of three to five years, a fine of up to $15,000, or both.

In the New York magazine interview, the 18-year-old woman said she has had a romantic relationship with her biological father for two years. Before that, they had been estranged for 12 years. She said they plan a wedding ceremony that won’t be legally registered. While New Jersey is one of the few states that currently doesn’t penalize incest between consenting adults, it doesn’t allow incestuous marriages.

“We plan to move to New Jersey where we can be safe under the law, since adult incest isn’t illegal there, and once I’m there I’ll tell everyone,” she told the magazine. “I’ll call my mom and let her know that we are in love and we are having children. If she wants to see her grandkids we’ll send her money and she can drive to see us. Once we are out about it I won’t be comfortable going back to my hometown. What if someone calls the cops?”

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Angelini moving to make incest illegal in N.J.

Source: Fox 8 -

Following reports of an 18-year-old woman who plans to marry her own father and move to New Jersey where “incest is legal,” legislation will be introduced to ban sex between related adults in the state.

New Jersey Assemblywoman Pat Angelini said on Wednesday she will introduce legislation to ban adult incest in New Jersey, according to NJ.com.

This comes in response to a flurry of media reports in the past week that noted sexual relationships between consenting, closely related adults is legal in the state.

Mary Pat Angelini

“Obviously, these types of relationships violate our acceptable moral standards and should be banned,” Angelini said in a news release.

On Tuesday, Assembly Republican Leader Jon Bramnick told NJ Advance Media he expected the legislature to take up the issue in the near future.

Jon Bramnick

“Any time you learn a father and daughter plan to get married, that has to be unacceptable,” Bramnick said. “It would appear to be against anything that’s acceptable in New Jersey.”

Angelini’s bill would make it illegal to marry or commit an act of sexual penetration with a blood relative. The crime would carry a prison term of three to five years and a fine of up to $15,000.

Incest was outlawed in New Jersey until 1979, when the state enacted a new criminal code that left a section planned for incest blank, NJ.com reported.

It is currently illegal in New Jersey for an adult to have sex with a closely related 16-year-old or 17-year-old.

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Angelini Bill Would Ban Incest in New Jersey

Source: NJ Advance Media -

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini on Wednesday said she’ll introduce legislation that bans adult incest in New Jersey — a response to a flurry of media reports in the last week that noted sexual relationships between consenting, closely related adults is legal here.

Mary Pat Angelini

“Obviously, these types of relationships violate our acceptable moral standards and should be banned,” Angelini (R-Monmouth) said in a news release.

Her announcement comes a day after Assembly Republican Leader Jon Bramnick told NJ Advance Media he expected the legislature to take up the issue quickly.

“I’m convinced there’s going to be some discussion,” Bramnick said. “Any time you learn a father and daughter plan to get married, that has to be unacceptable. It would appear to be against anything that’s acceptable in New Jersey.”

Tom Hester, a spokesman for Assembly Democrats, told said Wednesday Democrats are working on similar legislation.

“Prohibiting this is certainly something everyone agrees upon,” Hester said. That includes Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto, Hester said.

“Incestuous relationships create many ethical questions and are often times sexually abusive relationships blurred by the ‘consensual’ loophole,” Angelini said.

Her bill would makes it illegal to marry or commit an act of sexual penetration with a blood relative including a parent or child, brother or sister (including half-siblings), uncle or aunt, or nephew or niece. The third-degree crime would carry a prison term of three to five years, and a fine of up to $15,000, or both.

Media attention to the issue began after New York magazine ran article about an unnamed 18-year-old who said she plans to move to New Jersey and live as a married couple with her once-estranged father. They reportedly don’t plan to make the marriage legally binding, as it would still be considered void in New Jersey.

Sexual relationships among adult relatives weren’t always legal in New Jersey. Incest was outlawed in New Jersey until 1979, when the state enacted a new criminal code that left a section planned for incest blank, according to Peter Gilbreth, a Morristown-based attorney who handles both criminal and family cases.

Under the old statute, incest was a crime that carried a maximum penalty of 15 years in state prison, Gilbreth said.

It’s still illegal in New Jersey for an adult to have sex with a closely related 16-year-old or 17-year-old, even though 16 is the age of consent in New Jersey — except in situations where the older person has some supervisory role over the younger one.

Almost all other states bar incest in some form, though the particulars of which sexual relationships are barred vary from state to state. In most states, sexual relations between a parent and child, regardless of age, would be illegal. Rhode Island decriminalized incestuous relationships in 1989, though like in New Jersey, marriages are void.

Incest isn’t the only sexual taboo to come before the legislature recently. Last year, the state Assembly voted 76-0 to explicitly ban bestiality in New Jersey. A companion bill was referred to the state Senate’s judiciary committee but has not come up for a vote.

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Angelini Sponsors Bill to Ban Adult Incest in New Jersey

Assembly Republican Press Release -

Assemblywoman Mary Pat Angelini will introduce legislation that bans adult incest in New Jersey.

Mary Pat Angelini

“It might be hard to believe, but incest among consenting adults is technically legal in New Jersey,” said Angelini, R-Monmouth. “Obviously, these types of relationships violate our acceptable moral standards and should be banned.”

According to recent news reports, an 18-year-old woman from the Great Lakes region is planning to marry her formerly estranged, biological father and move to New Jersey, where currently there are no legal penalties for parties engaged in incest that are 18 years or older.

“Incestuous relationships create many ethical questions and are often times sexually-abusive relationships blurred by the ‘consensual’ loophole,” added Angelini.

The bill makes it illegal to marry or commit an act of sexual penetration with a blood relative including a parent or child, brother or sister, including half-siblings, or an uncle, aunt, nephew or niece.

The third degree crime carries a prison term of three to five years, and a fine of up to $15,000, or both.

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Angelini Statement on State of the State Address

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Mary Pat Angelini

Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader Mary Pat Angelini, R – Monmouth, issued the following statement on the State of the State Address delivered today by Gov. Christie to a Joint Session of the Legislature:

“Gov. Christie’s leadership over the past five years has given New Jersey residents and job creators a reprieve from increased taxes and fees. Under Christie’s leadership, we’ve experienced five years in a row with no new taxes, including a 2% cap on property taxes. I hope that we can continue to work together in this bipartisan matter to make New Jersey a more affordable place to live. Gov. Christie also made it clear today that quality education for every child will continue to be a top priority. This year alone direct State aid to schools reached over $11.9 billion.

“I’m also encouraged that Governor Christie has taken concrete actions to build on his commitment of changing the way society views drug addiction and the misconceptions about who it impacts, how it affects lives, and how to deal with it. I am hopeful that Governor Christie’s focus on treatment and changing the stigma around addiction will help make a positive impact in our fight against the heroin and prescription opioid epidemic that is spiraling out of control in our New Jersey communities.”

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Acting Governor Signs McHose & Angelini Resolution Promoting Educational Opportunities for Veterans

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Acting Governor Kim Guadagno today signed a joint resolution sponsored by Assembly Republicans Alison Littell McHose and Mary Pat Angelini that designates the second week of November as “Veterans’ Education Awareness Week.”

Alison Littell McHose

“We need to help returning veterans discover the productive educational opportunities they have earned,” said McHose, R – Sussex, Warren and Morris. “Some veterans may be unaware of the valuable resources available to them as they transition to civilian life. Veterans should know they have a future after their time in the military is completed.”

McHose’s husband, Morgan, recently returned from his latest deployment in Afghanistan, and has been previously deployed to Kosovo and Guantanamo Bay in Cuba with the New Jersey Army National Guard.

Mary Pat Angelini

“Many veterans are not familiar with these beneficial programs that can help launch them on a successful career path,” said Angelini, R – Monmouth. “Higher education is a powerful tool that provides career opportunities. Making sure veterans know they have the chance to further their skills is a way of expressing our gratitude.”

By establishing “Veterans’ Education Awareness Week,” the resolution (SJR-41/AJR 17) promotes the various resources available from the “Post 9/11 GI Bill” to help veterans attend college.

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Angelini Bill Improving Mental Health & Drug Treatment in Prisons Earns Approval of the General Assembly

Source: Assembly Republican Press Release -

Mary Pat Angelini

Assembly Republican Mary Pat Angelini sponsors legislation, approved today by the General Assembly, to improve the quality of mental health and substance abuse treatment for inmates. The bill (A-3722) requires the Department of Corrections (DOC) and the Department of Human Services (DHS) to share the authority over prison-based treatment centers.

“Inmates suffering from addiction or mental health issues will eventually serve their time and return to society,” said Angelini, the Assembly Republican Deputy Conference Leader. “Mental health issues and drugs are huge contributors to violence and crime in our neighborhoods. Better treatment can help prepare inmates for a crime-free life and make our streets safer.”

The measure, by establishing interagency oversight in the prisons, ensures that treatment standards and protocols are consistent so when prisoners get out, their treatment can continue on the same path, noted Angelini, R – Monmouth.

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