Tag: ticketmaster

Bucco Bill Reforming Ticket Sales Law Receives Assembly Approval

Assembly Republican Press Release -

Bipartisan legislation sponsored by Deputy Republican Leader Anthony M. Bucco, R-Morris and Somerset, that reforms New Jersey law concerning the way tickets are sold and handled was passed by the General Assembly on Monday.

Assembly bill A-2258 provides extensive reforms that give more transparency to the way tickets are bought, handled and sold. The bill also expands the “place of entertainment” definition to include venues owned by a school, college or house of worship in the state.

Anthony M. Bucco

“Numerous reports of how the sale of tickets are mishandled or manipulated is why these comprehensive reforms are necessary,” said Bucco. “Too frequently, the ticket purchaser is put at a disadvantage because the seller takes advantage of loopholes or gray areas in the current law. This bill establishes greater transparency in the ticket selling industry which will result in better protection for the consumer.”

Bucco’s bill prohibits paperless ticket systems from being used by an issuer unless the purchaser can transfer the paperless ticket(s) at any time and at any price without additional fees, independent of the issuer.

The legislation also requires that a ticket issuer, reseller or online marketplace will provide a full refund to the purchaser of a resold ticket, including any fees, if the event is cancelled or if the ticket purchased is counterfeit.

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BUCCO-RUDDER BILL REFORMING TICKET SALES LAW APPROVED IN COMMITTEE

Assemblyman Anthony M. Bucco / 973-927-2526
Assemblyman Scott Rudder / 609-654-1498

June 18, 2012

Bipartisan legislation sponsored by Deputy Republican Leader Anthony M. Bucco, R-Morris and Somerset, and Assistant Republican Leader Scott Rudder, R-Burlington, that reforms New Jersey law concerning the way tickets are sold and handled was passed by the Assembly Regulated Professions Committee on Monday.

Assembly bill A-2258 provides extensive reforms that give more transparency to the way tickets are bought, handled and sold. The bill also expands the “place of entertainment” definition to include venues owned by a school, college or house of worship in the state.

Further, the legislation prohibits those who own or operate a place of entertainment from making initial ticket sales to themselves and no person who has access to tickets prior to the sale to the general public can withhold more than 5 percent of all the available seating for the event.

“Numerous reports of how the sale of tickets are mishandled or manipulated is why these comprehensive reforms are necessary,” said Bucco. “Too frequently, the general public is put at a disadvantage because the seller uses loopholes or gray areas in the current law at their expense. This bill establishes greater transparency in the ticket selling industry which will result in better protections for the consumer.”

Rudder added,” Most ticket sellers operate professionally and know that customer satisfaction is critical to their success. Unfortunately, there are instances where some ticket sales are conducted under questionable practices, and the consumer is not only dissatisfied, but they feel hoodwinked. This bill clarifies and reforms the transaction process governing ticket sales and provides appropriate penalties for those who try to manipulate the law. Sellers and brokers have nothing to be afraid of if they abide by these reforms. The consumer also benefits by knowing that they will no longer be preyed upon.”

A violation of the bill will be both an unlawful practice under the Consumer Fraud Act and a crime of the fourth degree. An unlawful practice under the consumer fraud act is punishable by a monetary penalty of not more than $10,000 for a first offense and not more than $20,000 for any subsequent offense. In addition, an unlawful practice violation can result in cease and desist orders issued by the Attorney General, the assessment of punitive damages and the awarding of treble (triple) damages and costs to the injured. A crime in the fourth degree is punishable by up to 18 months imprisonment, a fine of $10,000 or both.

A-2258 also removes price limits on the resale of all tickets and at the same time enhances consumer protections. These protections, which will be required of ticket issuers, resellers and online marketplaces, include a full refund by the seller, reseller or facilitator of a sale or resale if the event is cancelled, the ticket does not grant entry to the event, or the ticket does not match its advertised description.

This bill prohibits ticket issuers from issuing “paperless tickets” in an electronic form that is not readily transferable to a subsequent purchaser or that conditions entry into an event on the presenting of documentation, such as the original purchaser’s credit card, that cannot be readily transferred to a subsequent purchaser.

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