Tag: Caroline Casagrande

Fiocchi bill would protect antique gun collectors

Source: The Daily Journal -

Legislation introduced in the state assembly Monday saw another local politician seeking to protect antique gun collectors from prosecution under New Jersey gun laws, adding momentum to a growing movement against state gun statutes.

Sam Fiocchi

Sam Fiocchi

A bill introduced Monday by Assemblyman Sam Fiocchi would exempt antique firearms from the state’s gun laws, which have come under criticism in recent weeks following the arrest of a 72-year-old Port Elizabeth man for having an unloaded flintlock pistol in his car.

“Many people from a variety of backgrounds collect vintage guns for many reasons,” Fiocchi said in a news release. “Some enjoy trading and selling while others are history buffs who attend national gun shows looking for another ‘treasure.’ Regardless, collectors should not face criminal prosecution or prison for possessing or transporting such a firearm that poses no danger to public safety.”

The Fiocchi bill seeks to revise the definition of “antique firearm” in the state’s gun law, and would exempt the possession of such unloaded antique handguns from prosecution under the charge of unlawful possession of a firearm, according to a news release issued by Fiocchi.

Under current law, an “antique firearm” is defined to include only rifles and shotguns, Fiocchi said. There is a separate definition for “antique handguns,” and the new measure would amend the law so there is one definition of “antique firearm,” including handguns.

Fiocchi is not the first lawmaker to respond following the November arrest of Gordon Van Gilder by the Cumberland County Sheriff’s Department for having an unloaded 300-year-old flintlock pistol in the glove compartment of his car.

Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande has stated that she plans to introduce a bill that would align state law with a federal statute exempting firearms manufactured before 1898.

The Cumberland County Prosecutor’s Office announced Wednesday that they dismissed charges against Van Gilder, who had by that point hired a lawyer and gained local and national attention for his case.

Though Fiocchi did not specifically address the Van Gilder incident in his news release, other lawmakers have been more direct in calling for change following Van Gilder’s arrest.

 

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Casagrande antique gun bill endorsed by South Jersey Times

South Jersey Times Editorial -

Mention guns and you’ll trigger passionate discussions.

The recent case of a Cumberland County gun collector who found himself charged after cops discovered him with an antique weapon has focused the spotlight on the need for revisions in our own state laws governing firearms.

The story all unfolded on Nov. 19. Gordan Van Gilder, 72, of Port Elizabeth, was returning home after picking up his nearly 300-year-old flintlock pistol from a Vineland pawn shop.

The vehicle he was a passenger in was stopped by Millville police and the gun was found. There is much more to the saga of the stop including questions about why Van Gilder and his driver were in part of the city that is a known drug area, but our focus is on the antiquated state laws governing weapon possession.

During the motor vehicle stop, Van Gilder was up-front with police, according to authorities, and told them about the antique weapon in the glove compartment. The weapon was inside an envelope and was not loaded, reports said.

Despite the age of the gun and the circumstances that apparently showed there was no ill intent on Van Gilder’s part, Van Gilder was charged with unlawful possession of a weapon.

Cumberland County Prosecutor Jennifer Webb-McRae used her “prosecutorial discretion” and wisely dismissed the gun charges against Van Gilder.

Webb-McRae also rightfully noted any type of gun in a vehicle can cause trouble “… the public should be forewarned about the prescriptions against possessing a firearm (even an antique) in a vehicle.”

Some are describing the incident with the antique firearm as an example of overreaction by police, but the point must be made here — and made in the strongest terms — the officers involved were following the law.

It appears the officers had good reason to stop the vehicle Van Gilder was a passenger in and they had no choice but to charge him.

There’s plenty that has been debated and will be debated about this case. That’s guaranteed.

One important result of this incident is how it has highlighted another New Jersey state law in need of change. That’s a good thing.

Caroline Casagrande

Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande (R-Monmouth) plans to introduce a bill that would align the state’s law with a federal statute that exempts firearms manufactured before 1898 from weapons laws. That would put New Jersey law in line with current federal statutes.

It’s a move that makes sense.

In the wrong hands, weapons are deadly. But our Constitution guarantees us the right to bear arms and that’s something that can’t change.

What must change are our antiquated gun laws in New Jersey so they make sense.

Note: A-4250 was introduced on Feb. 24 and is also sponsored by Assemblymen Dancer and Fiocchi.

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Casagrande bill would exempt Antique firearms from N.J.’s gun

South Jersey Times -

A New Jersey State Assemblywoman announced her plans to introduce legislation that would exempt antique firearms from the state’s gun law, according to a statement released Thursday.

Caroline Casagrande

In the announcement, Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande (R – Monmouth) said the legislation was in response to charges faced by Gordon Van Gilder, the former teacher facing a possible 10-year prison sentence after police found a flintlock pistol in his car in November.

“There is a complete lack of common sense when a 72-year-old man is facing a decade in prison for possessing an unloaded, 300-year-old antique pistol,” she said in the release. “Granting this exemption will put New Jersey in line with federal law that already exempts the possession of firearms manufactured prior to 1898.”

Van Gilder faces one count of unlawful possession of a weapon, according to the Cumberland County Criminal Case Management Office. The case is still in the complaint stage and no court dates are scheduled.

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Casagrande to Introduce Bill Addressing Antique Gun Possession

Assembly Republican Press Release -

Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande said today she will introduce legislation exempting antique firearms from the state’s gun laws.

A retired Millville teacher is facing a 2nd degree felony charge for the possession of a handgun when police discovered his 1760s “Queen Anne” flintlock pistol during a traffic stop last November.

Caroline Casagrande

“There is a complete lack of common sense when a 72-year-old man is facing a decade in prison for possessing an unloaded, 300-year-old antique pistol,” said Casagrande. R-Monmouth. “Granting this exemption will put New Jersey in line with federal law that already exempts the possession of all historic firearms manufactured prior to 1898. Hopefully, the Cumberland County prosecutor will acknowledge the ludicrous nature of charging a man with no prior history and simply dismiss this case.”

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Christie Signs Casagrande Measure on Life-Saving Allergy Treatment

Assembly Republican Press Release -

Legislation sponsored by Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande that increases access to life-saving medicine for children with severe allergies in school was signed into law today by Gov. Christie. The bill, A-304/S-801, authorizes school nurses and trained personnel to administer epinephrine to any student having an anaphylactic reaction.

Caroline Casagrande

“As many as two children in every classroom have at least one food allergy,” said Casagrande, R – Monmouth. “Schools should be able to respond quickly and appropriately to help children with a serious allergic reaction.”

Recent studies suggest that one in 13 children are affected by food allergies. More than 15 percent of school aged children with food allergies have had a reaction at school.

“While many parents of children with serious food allergies supply a prescription to the school nurse or teacher, not all kids have an epinephrine auto-injector prescribed specifically for them. This helps those children,” said Casagrande.

The new law requires that schools maintain a supply of epinephrine auto-injectors, and amends current law to provide immunity to school employees and agents for good faith acts or omissions concerning the emergency administration of epinephrine to specifically include a physician providing a prescription under a standing protocol for school epinephrine.

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Casagrande: BPU should act on judge’s rate cut recommendation

Source: Asbury Park Press [Letter-to-the-Editor by Caroline Casagrande] -

Caroline Casagrande

A state administrative law judge has recommended state regulators cut Jersey Central Power & Light’s rates by $107.5 million. It is now time for the Board of Public Utilities to act. JCP&L customers have waited over three years for relief. The BPU should respond quickly and in the best interest of consumers who have been footing the bill.

In 2011, the Division of Rate Counsel voiced concerns that JCP&L was earning excessive profits and not investing in infrastructure improvements. BPU ordered JCP&L to open its books to determine whether its profits were reasonable. The findings proved they were not, which is what the ratepayer advocate and I had been saying all along. BPU staff recommended that JCP&L cut its rates by $169.8 million.

In April 2013, when JCP&L sought a rate increase, Assemblywoman Amy Handlin and I spoke out in opposition at a public hearing in Freehold. We presented the BPU with a petition with 1,600 signatures of individuals who cited the utility’s poor performance and communication with customers after superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Irene.

JCP&L is expected to file an appeal of the judge’s recent recommendation. It is my hope BPU will do its job, and protect ratepayers from illegally high utility rates. Consumers have a right to expect reliable, quality service. They were overcharged and it’s time to start repaying that money without excuse or delays. We know we can’t be late paying our electric bills. The state shouldn’t let JCP&L be late returning people their own money.

Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande
11th Legislative District

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Casagrande: BPU should act on judge’s rate cut recommendation

Caroline Casagrande

Asbury Park Press Letter-to-the-editor by Caroline Casagrande -

A state administrative law judge has recommended state regulators cut Jersey Central Power & Light’s rates by $107.5 million. It is now time for the Board of Public Utilities to act. JCP&L customers have waited over three years for relief. The BPU should respond quickly and in the best interest of consumers who have been footing the bill.

In 2011, the Division of Rate Counsel voiced concerns that JCP&L was earning excessive profits and not investing in infrastructure improvements. BPU ordered JCP&L to open its books to determine whether its profits were reasonable. The findings proved they were not, which is what the ratepayer advocate and I had been saying all along. BPU staff recommended that JCP&L cut its rates by $169.8 million.

In April 2013, when JCP&L sought a rate increase, Assemblywoman Amy Handlin and I spoke out in opposition at a public hearing in Freehold. We presented the BPU with a petition with 1,600 signatures of individuals who cited the utility’s poor performance and communication with customers after superstorm Sandy and Hurricane Irene.

JCP&L is expected to file an appeal of the judge’s recent recommendation. It is my hope BPU will do its job, and protect ratepayers from illegally high utility rates. Consumers have a right to expect reliable, quality service. They were overcharged and it’s time to start repaying that money without excuse or delays. We know we can’t be late paying our electric bills. The state shouldn’t let JCP&L be late returning people their own money.

Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande

11th Legislative District

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Casagrande presented with ‘Elected Women of Excellence’ award

Source: Red Bank Hub -

Caroline Casagrande

The National Foundation for Women Legislators (NFWL) announced Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande (R-11) as one of its 2014 Elected Women of Excellence Award winners.

Casagrande was one of 19 honorees to receive the award at the Toast to the Women of Excellence ceremony in Philadelphia during NFWL’s recent 2014 annual conference.

The award was established in 2013 as part of the NFWL’s 75th-anniversary celebration to honor the hard work and dedication of women leaders from across the country. NFWL has recognized 60 elected women from 37 states.

Winners were nominated by their colleagues and constituents from their home states and then chosen by NFWL board members. Casagrande was nominated by NFWL Chair and state Sen. Diane Allen (R-7).

“We are thrilled to acknowledge these women,” Allen said in a press release. “They showcase the strong leadership qualities, focused work ethic and determination that we try to instill in young women across the nation, and deserve to be recognized for their tremendous efforts.”

Casagrande is currently serving her fourth term in the New Jersey Assembly. She is the assistant Republican leader and a member of the Appropriations, Financial Institutions and Insurance, and Women and Children committees.

For more information about NFWL, visit www.womenlegislators.org.

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Casagrande discusses deer hunting legislation

Caroline Casagrande

NJ Herald -

Is allowing commercial deer hunting a good idea? Some lawmakers in New Jersey are trying to overturn the state’s ban on hunters selling deer meat, and they are getting support from some ecologists.

A bill was introduced into the General Assembly earlier this year that would do just that, and the bill is currently waiting for a hearing in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee.

“Anybody driving around is able to see a deer population that has exploded,” said Assemblywoman Caroline Casagrande, who is sponsoring the bill. “I’m concerned about the high number of Lyme cases and I’m also very concerned about the car accidents, half of which occur between October and December.”

The bill, A-3039, is still waiting to be heard by the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee before it can move forward. If passed, hunters will be able to apply for a commercial hunting license which not only allows the sale of deer meat, but also meat from small game such as beavers, raccoons, and otters.

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Assembly Approves Casagrande Measure on Life-Saving Allergy Treatment in Schools

Assembly Republican Press Release -

Assembly Republican Caroline Casagrande’s legislation to increase access to life-saving medicine for children with severe allergies in school earned approval today in the General Assembly. The bill, A-304, authorizes school nurses and trained personnel to administer epinephrine to any student having an anaphylactic reaction.

Caroline Casagrande

“As many as two children in every classroom have at least one food allergy,” said Casagrande, R – Monmouth. “Schools should be able to respond quickly and appropriately to help children with a serious allergic reaction.”

Recent studies suggest that one in 13 children are affected by food allergies. More than 15 percent of school aged children with food allergies have had a reaction at school.

“While many parents of children with serious food allergies supply a prescription to the school nurse or teacher, not all kids have an epinephrine auto-injector prescribed specifically for them. This helps those children,” said Casagrande.

Current law requires that parents provide written authorization for the school to administer an injection. However, Casagrande said “a student with an undiagnosed allergy can have a reaction for the first time in the school.”

The bill also requires that schools maintain a supply of epinephrine auto-injectors, and amends the law to provide immunity to school employees and agents for good faith acts or omissions concerning the emergency administration of epinephrine to specifically include a physician providing a prescription under a standing protocol for school epinephrine. In response to the rise in child food allergies, a number of states have enacted laws allowing schools to maintain a supply of epinephrine that can be used for any student in an anaphylactic emergency.

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